Dec 18

Current Big Bear Lake Foreclosure Trends

92315 Foreclosure Trends

Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Foreclosure Filings—Notice of Default filings are the first step in the foreclosure process. Notice of Trustee Sale filings set the date and time of an auction, and serve as the homeowner’s final notice before sale.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Foreclosure Outcomes—After the filing of a Notice of Trustee Sale, there are only three possible outcomes. First, the sale can be Cancelled for reasons that include a successful loan modification or short sale, a filing error, or a legal requirement to re-file the notice after extended postponements. Alternatively, if the property is taken to sale, the bank will place the opening bid. If a 3rd party, typically an investor, bids more than the bank’s opening bid, the property will be Sold to 3rd Party; if not, it will go Back to the Bank and become part of that bank’s REO inventory.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Foreclosure Inventories—Preforeclosure inventory is an estimate of the number of properties that have had a Notice of Default filed against the property, but have not yet been Scheduled for Sale. The Scheduled for Sale inventory indicates those properties that have had a Notice of Trustee Sale filed, but have not yet been sold or had the sale cancelled. The Bank Owned (REO) inventory indicates the number of properties that have been sold Back to the Bank at the trustee sale, and which the bank has not yet resold to another party.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Foreclosure Bids—The Published Bid is the amount listed in the Notice of Trustee Sale and is typically the balance due at the original date of sale. The Opening Bid is the bank’s starting bid at auction, and is often discounted from the Published Bid. The Winning Bid is the highest bid received at auction and reflects the amount at which the bank or 3rd party purchased the foreclosure.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Foreclosure Discounting—This chart compares the winning Bid Amount of properties sold at trustee sale to both the outstanding Loan Amount, and the current Market Value. Banks place an Opening Bid for each property and if a 3rd Party does not make a higher bid, the property will be sold Back to Bank (REO) for the Opening Bid amount. Properties Sold to 3rd Parties will typically have Winning Bids with deeper discounts to both Loan Amount and Market Value as only low Opening Bids will attract investor interest.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Time to Foreclose—The average number of days between the filing of the Notice of Default and the final sale at auction for foreclosure sales that occurred during the specified month. Time to Resell—The average number of days between the final sale at auction and when the property was resold by the bank or 3rd party.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Filings By Number of Bedrooms—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the property’s number of bedrooms.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Filings By Square Foot—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the size range of the property in square feet.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Filings By Year Built—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by when the property was built.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Filings By Est. Market Value—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the estimated market value of the property in foreclosure.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Filings By Loan Balance—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the balance of the loan in foreclosure.
Graph of Foreclosure Filings in Zip Code 92315

Filings By Loan Origination Date—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the quarter and year in which the loan was originally made.
Jul 22

7 Reasons Your Big Bear Listing May Not Be Marketed Fairly

Many sellers that list their home for sale in the Big Bear area get a raw deal from their listing agent. 

1. Listing with an out of the area agent gives you a small chance of being shown. Agents from out of the area list homes in Big Bear in the So Cal MLS, but not the local Big Bear MLS. Most homes sold in Big Bear are represented by a local Big Bear agent and are listed in the Big Bear MLS. Acces to your home may require a phone call or appointment. If the agent from out of the area has made it to Big Bear to put on a So Cal lock box, it isn’t programmed for the local agents MLS key.

2. Listing with the wrong local agent will give out of the area agents less motivation to show your home. Some of Big Bear’s local agents will offer less commission to agents through the So Cal MLS, than the local MLS. So, an out of the area agent may only see the commission offered at 2% and the agents that are local may see a 3% commission.

3. Does your listing agent syndicate to sites that promote your home, or do they keep the listing out of the hands of sites that could help sell your home? 

4. Does your listing agent have professional photos taken of your home for display on line? We are still seeing photos taken from cell phones and posted in the Big Bear and So Cal MLS. In this day and age, photos are the new open house. The maximum number should be uploaded and they should be a high quality representation of your home.

5. Does the description tell potential buyers the truth, or just what everyone wants to hear?  An example of this is: I see listings that are over 5 miles from Big Bear Lake that state “Near the Lake”, or homes on 2500 square foot lots that state “Secluded Setting”.

6. Is your short sale priced well below market value? Listing short sales below market value gives the consumer miss-information, and is damaging to the overall market. Banks are not inclined to accept offers through short sale that are below the true market value. Banks will do an appraisal or BPO to establish that the short sale offer is not shorting them on the payoff any more than the market dictates.

7. Is your home easily accessible and show ready?  I don’t understand why agents will list homes and not install a lock box or give access. They also fail to put up yard signs and insert photos of the home. As a seller, you only get one chance to make a good impression, and failure to prepare the house, photos and access will kill the buzz of your new listing.

 

If you would like to list your home with an agent that truly markets your home, please give me a call.

Steve 909 725 5889

MY CLIENT REVIEWS

Jul 18

Top 10 Short Sale Myths

Myth #1: The homeowner must fall behind on mortgage payments in order to qualify for a short sale.

Debunked: 
 Years ago this may have been true, but not in 2012.

  • A financial hardship must exist, such as the ARM (Adjustable Rate Mortgage) increasing in monthly payments.
  • Loss of job or income.
  • Health or medical issues.
  • Extraordinary loss in home value (which may be considered a hardship).

Note: Agents should not advise a homeowner to miss a mortgage payment. 

Myth #2: Banks would rather foreclose on a property than approve a short sale.

Debunked: 
 Many still believe this myth to be true, but more accurately, banks would prefer not to foreclose on a property due to the $50-70k it may cost the bank per transaction. Banks lose less money on a short sale than on a foreclosure.

Note: In California, some lenders may pay owners as much as $25,000 to opt for a short sale. 

Myth #3:
 Homeowners must be pre-approved by their lender to be eligible for a short sale.

Debunked:  Absolutely not true. By and large, most lenders will consider short sale offers. However, each lender may have unique and specific processes to follow, from listing the home to the acceptance of a short sale. Bypassing any part of this process may result the sale not closing, so be sure to follow each lenders’ processes closely.

Myth #4: Short sales never close.

Debunked:  Obviously not true. In some areas of the U.S., nearly 50% of all closings are considered to be “distressed” properties, meaning REOs and short sales.

Myth #5: Short sales take months (and months) to close.

Debunked:  The short sale processes must be learned. Once mastered, it may not be uncommon to close a short sale in 30 days.  However, certain idiosyncrasies may slow the process and each lender presents their own unique set of specific challenges. No two short sale transactions are identical.

Myth #6: Damage to the homeowner’s credit standing is comparable in a short sale and a foreclosure.

Debunked:  In many cases, credit repercussions and deficiency protections are more damaging with a foreclosure. Short sale transactions can often lead to faster financial recovery for the homeowner and should be carefully considered.

Note: If the homeowner missed no mortgage payments, they may be eligible to finance the purchase of a home immediately following a short sale transaction.  

Myth #7: Following a short sale, the homeowner will be ineligible to purchase another property for the next 5-7 years.

Debunked:  Not true. Using conventional lending guidelines, some consumers may obtain a Fannie Mae backed mortgage a short 24 months after the close of their short sale.

Myth #8: After a short sale transaction, the homeowner will receive a 1099 and be forced to declare the loss as income.

Debunked: The owner may indeed receive a 1099, but due to the 2007 Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act, among other considerations, the homeowner may not owe any taxes on their transaction.*

Note: This Act is due to expire at the end of 2012.

Myth #9: The lender will sue the homeowner after the close of a short sale (or foreclosure, or deed in lieu of foreclosure) for the deficiency.

Debunked: California has certain anti-deficiency protections in place for short sales and foreclosures, depending on the circumstances.*

Myth #10: As an agent, I don’t need additional training to learn all of the ins and outs of the short sale process. And if I wait long enough, the market will recover so I may not need to deal with short sales at all.

Debunked: How long are you willing to wait? Based on the most recent housing reports, home values are still falling. Hopefully, 2012 will see the bottom of the housing market but price recovery may continue to take some time.


*Information provided by CAR (California Association of Realtors)
Jul 14

Are You Ready to Buy a Cabin in Big Bear?

Most buyer’s start their search online before they contact a realtor. This gives the buyer a feel for the market, but not always a true picture.

After you have done some research online, you should contact a lender to determine the current mortgage rates, what you will qualify for, and a price range that will produce a payment that is comfortable on you budget. Taking the time to get your prequalification with a lender will allow you to avoid looking at homes that out of your budget.

Most lenders currently require a minimum of 20% down payment for second homes, and it’s a good idea to offer 3% in good faith deposit. Closing costs are additional cash needed to buy, so be sure to inquire with your lender what these will be for your loan etc.

This is also a good time to select a local Realtor to represent you during the buying process. Selecting your agent is an important process. I would recommend reading blogs from agents that live and work in the Big Bear area to get a feel for the agent that will best represent your interests. It would also be a good idea to check the agent’s client endorsements and reviews. Once you select your agent, I recommend communicating your list of wants and needs so that they can best serve you.

Every buyer wants to get a great deal, but great deals aren’t going to last long. Be ready to act quickly once you see the home that fits your needs and is priced like a deal. Be prepared to compete with other buyers, and often these homes will sell at or above the listing price.

Don’t forget to bring your checkbook!

Jul 12

Foreclosure Trends for Big Bear Lake

92315 Foreclosure Trends

Foreclosure Filings—Notice of Default filings are the first step in the foreclosure process. Notice of Trustee Sale filings set the date and time of an auction, and serve as the homeowner’s final notice before sale.
Foreclosure Outcomes—After the filing of a Notice of Trustee Sale, there are only three possible outcomes. First, the sale can be Cancelled for reasons that include a successful loan modification or short sale, a filing error, or a legal requirement to re-file the notice after extended postponements. Alternatively, if the property is taken to sale, the bank will place the opening bid. If a 3rd party, typically an investor, bids more than the bank’s opening bid, the property will be Sold to 3rd Party; if not, it will go Back to the Bank and become part of that bank’s REO inventory.
Foreclosure Inventories—Preforeclosure inventory is an estimate of the number of properties that have had a Notice of Default filed against the property, but have not yet been Scheduled for Sale. The Scheduled for Sale inventory indicates those properties that have had a Notice of Trustee Sale filed, but have not yet been sold or had the sale cancelled. The Bank Owned (REO) inventory indicates the number of properties that have been sold Back to the Bank at the trustee sale, and which the bank has not yet resold to another party.
Foreclosure Bids—The Published Bid is the amount listed in the Notice of Trustee Sale and is typically the balance due at the original date of sale. The Opening Bid is the bank’s starting bid at auction, and is often discounted from the Published Bid. The Winning Bid is the highest bid received at auction and reflects the amount at which the bank or 3rd party purchased the foreclosure.
Foreclosure Discounting—This chart compares the winning Bid Amount of properties sold at trustee sale to both the outstanding Loan Amount, and the current Market Value. Banks place an Opening Bid for each property and if a 3rd Party does not make a higher bid, the property will be sold Back to Bank (REO) for the Opening Bid amount. Properties Sold to 3rd Parties will typically have Winning Bids with deeper discounts to both Loan Amount and Market Value as only low Opening Bids will attract investor interest.
Time to Foreclose—The average number of days between the filing of the Notice of Default and the final sale at auction for foreclosure sales that occurred during the specified month. Time to Resell—The average number of days between the final sale at auction and when the property was resold by the bank or 3rd party.
Filings By Number of Bedrooms—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the property’s number of bedrooms.
Filings By Square Foot—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the size range of the property in square feet.
Filings By Year Built—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by when the property was built.
Filings By Est. Market Value—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the estimated market value of the property in foreclosure.
Filings By Loan Balance—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the balance of the loan in foreclosure.
Filings By Loan Origination Date—The number of foreclosures that have received either a Notice of Default or Notice of Sale, shown in columns arranged by the quarter and year in which the loan was originally made.
Jul 11

Moonridge Real Estate Statistics YTD

Year to date this year the average price sold is $234,743 in the Moonridge area of Big Bear. Compared with $286,326 for the same period in 2011. That is an 18% drop in the average price sold. Most of the drop in the average can be contributed to the high price sale that was recorded last year at $1,250,000 in Moonridge vs. this year at $575,000. Sales price to list price differential remains in the 94% – 96% range. Average days on the market also remain consistent around 125. The average price per square foot sold has dropped from $189.49 in 2011 to $165.01 in 2012 (13%). Traditional sales in the Moonridge area continue to dominate the market with 57 this year and 58 last year for the same period, while the number of foreclosures sold in Moonridge remains low with 9 this year and 10 last year. Short sales have made up the increase with 13 closed so far in 2012, compared to only 5 in the same period of 2011.

 

Oct 19

Instructions for Winterizing Your Big Bear Home

Winterizing your Big Bear Cabin can save you money and avoid damage to your plumbing system. Below are the instructions that the DWP sends out to help homeowners understand the process. It’s a good idea to turn your stop and waste valve off whenever you are leaving the mountains, even in the summer. By doing this you will keep the stop and waste valve from becoming hard to turn or stuck in one position.

Steve Hirschler
Market Specialist, Inventory Expert,
Big Bear Real Estate Agent
Coldwell Banker
The Tim Wood Group
42153 Big Bear Blvd.
P.O. BOX 6820
Big Bear Lake, CA 92315
DRE#01703081
stevehirschler@gmail.com
909 866-3481 EXT. 217
CELL 909 725-5889
Fax 909 866-3531

Jun 18

10 Year Deed Recording History for the Big Bear Area

10 Year Deed Recording History for the Big Bear Area

  • YTD 2010 Deed Recordings are down by 14 units (3.7%) over the same period last year, but up 62 units (21%) over the same period in 2008.
  • 2004 was the top year with 1061 recordings during this period, which is 198% higher than this period of 2010.